ozu-teapot:

It’s a Wonderful Life - Frank Capra - 1946

(via magnificentlymeaningless)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Marcos Martinez
Parrot II
Parrot
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Marcos Martinez
Parrot II
Parrot

europeansculpture:

Joseph Csaky - Tête de Femme, 1924 

Kröller-Müller Museum, Holland

(via thatsbutterbaby)

archaicwonder:

Egyptian Faience Amulet of Ptaikos, 3rd-2nd century BC
The dwarf god Ptaikos (aka Pataikos, Patek or Ptaichos) was an incarnation of Ptah-Seker. Ptaikos was very popular from the New Kingdom onward, providing protection from creatures, such as snakes and crocodiles.  His counterpart was Bes, who was also portrayed as a dwarf god.
Here Ptaikos is depicted naked with a small body on bowed legs and a large head. He advertises his powers over evil by adopting a “master of animals” pose as he stands with each foot planted on the snout of a crocodile, whose tails wrap around to the back of the amulet. Ptaikos’ arms are bent at the elbows and he holds a snake in each hand. A skullcap covers his head and is surmounted by a scarab. A falcon is perched on each shoulder.
The inclusion of the falcons in the composition and the depiction of handling and taming of dangerous animals grants Ptaikos an affinity with another protective god, Harpokrates, in his role as the Child Horus/Horus the Savior. This relationship is strengthened by the representation of figures Isis and Nephthys who face outward at either side. As the mother and aunt, respectively, of Harpokrates the inclusion of these goddesses on the amulet make the connection to Harpokrates clear. A winged goddess, perhaps Nut, with the sun disk atop her head, is depicted in high relief at the back of the amulet. This goddess is responsible for protecting Ptaikos.
archaicwonder:

Egyptian Faience Amulet of Ptaikos, 3rd-2nd century BC
The dwarf god Ptaikos (aka Pataikos, Patek or Ptaichos) was an incarnation of Ptah-Seker. Ptaikos was very popular from the New Kingdom onward, providing protection from creatures, such as snakes and crocodiles.  His counterpart was Bes, who was also portrayed as a dwarf god.
Here Ptaikos is depicted naked with a small body on bowed legs and a large head. He advertises his powers over evil by adopting a “master of animals” pose as he stands with each foot planted on the snout of a crocodile, whose tails wrap around to the back of the amulet. Ptaikos’ arms are bent at the elbows and he holds a snake in each hand. A skullcap covers his head and is surmounted by a scarab. A falcon is perched on each shoulder.
The inclusion of the falcons in the composition and the depiction of handling and taming of dangerous animals grants Ptaikos an affinity with another protective god, Harpokrates, in his role as the Child Horus/Horus the Savior. This relationship is strengthened by the representation of figures Isis and Nephthys who face outward at either side. As the mother and aunt, respectively, of Harpokrates the inclusion of these goddesses on the amulet make the connection to Harpokrates clear. A winged goddess, perhaps Nut, with the sun disk atop her head, is depicted in high relief at the back of the amulet. This goddess is responsible for protecting Ptaikos.
archaicwonder:

Egyptian Faience Amulet of Ptaikos, 3rd-2nd century BC
The dwarf god Ptaikos (aka Pataikos, Patek or Ptaichos) was an incarnation of Ptah-Seker. Ptaikos was very popular from the New Kingdom onward, providing protection from creatures, such as snakes and crocodiles.  His counterpart was Bes, who was also portrayed as a dwarf god.
Here Ptaikos is depicted naked with a small body on bowed legs and a large head. He advertises his powers over evil by adopting a “master of animals” pose as he stands with each foot planted on the snout of a crocodile, whose tails wrap around to the back of the amulet. Ptaikos’ arms are bent at the elbows and he holds a snake in each hand. A skullcap covers his head and is surmounted by a scarab. A falcon is perched on each shoulder.
The inclusion of the falcons in the composition and the depiction of handling and taming of dangerous animals grants Ptaikos an affinity with another protective god, Harpokrates, in his role as the Child Horus/Horus the Savior. This relationship is strengthened by the representation of figures Isis and Nephthys who face outward at either side. As the mother and aunt, respectively, of Harpokrates the inclusion of these goddesses on the amulet make the connection to Harpokrates clear. A winged goddess, perhaps Nut, with the sun disk atop her head, is depicted in high relief at the back of the amulet. This goddess is responsible for protecting Ptaikos.

archaicwonder:

Egyptian Faience Amulet of Ptaikos, 3rd-2nd century BC

The dwarf god Ptaikos (aka Pataikos, Patek or Ptaichos) was an incarnation of Ptah-Seker. Ptaikos was very popular from the New Kingdom onward, providing protection from creatures, such as snakes and crocodiles.  His counterpart was Bes, who was also portrayed as a dwarf god.

Here Ptaikos is depicted naked with a small body on bowed legs and a large head. He advertises his powers over evil by adopting a “master of animals” pose as he stands with each foot planted on the snout of a crocodile, whose tails wrap around to the back of the amulet. Ptaikos’ arms are bent at the elbows and he holds a snake in each hand. A skullcap covers his head and is surmounted by a scarab. A falcon is perched on each shoulder.

The inclusion of the falcons in the composition and the depiction of handling and taming of dangerous animals grants Ptaikos an affinity with another protective god, Harpokrates, in his role as the Child Horus/Horus the Savior. This relationship is strengthened by the representation of figures Isis and Nephthys who face outward at either side. As the mother and aunt, respectively, of Harpokrates the inclusion of these goddesses on the amulet make the connection to Harpokrates clear. A winged goddess, perhaps Nut, with the sun disk atop her head, is depicted in high relief at the back of the amulet. This goddess is responsible for protecting Ptaikos.

(via virtual-artifacts)

kardiologn:

'Creation of the cosmos in Dendera.'

Some of the most famous images from the Hathor Temple at Dendera can be found in the crypt beneath its southern wall. The reliefs here portray human figures next to bulb-like objects reminiscent of oversized light bulbs.

What we witness here is the creation of the cosmos, in the from of an elongated bulb. It springs from a lotus-flower on a boat, the lotus being the first object that floated on the primordial sea, according to Egyptian cosmology. From the flower also appears a snake, which is equated to the rising sun and the god Harsomptus and which is enveloped by the cosmos. Harsomptus is also present in human form, standing behind the bulb and his ka (living essence) is kneeling beneath the bulb. 

In the representation on the left the cosmos-bulb with its sun-snake is supported by the God of infinity, Heh, kneeling on a square base. The bulb on the right is supported by a Djed pillar with arms, symbol of stability and continuity.

A similar sun-snake emerging from a lotus flower can be found on the astronomical ceiling of the outer hypostyle hall (see pictures 29527 and 29528.)

It is in this crypt that the golden statue of the ba (soul) of Hathor (mother of Harsomptus) was kept. And it was probably here that the sacred procession started on the eve of the first day of the New Year, bringing the statue of the goddess to the roof of the temple, just as the newly created sun rose from the abyss on the First Day.

This part of the Dendera Temple was built during the later Ptolemaic period (first century BC). Photo Mick Palarczyk.

smoke-thc-drop-lsd:

alluringabyss:

Burmese Tourmaline 8.15 ct

DAMN

loverofbeauty:

Alfred Weidinger:  René Burri, Viena, 2012.   (RIP age 81)   source